Tag Archives: American Historical Fiction

Episode 96 : Interview with Geraldine Brooks author of Horse



Horse isn’t just an animal story—it’s a moving narrative about race and art.”
—TIME

A discarded painting in a junk pile, a skeleton in an attic, and the greatest racehorse in American history: from these strands, Pulitzer Prize winner Geraldine Brooks braids a sweeping story of spirit, obsession, and racial injustice across American history. Horse is a fascinating and richly compelling story that I could not put down.

What a thrill and honor to host Geraldine Brooks for this episode. We talked about the greatest racehorse of all time, the Kentucky Derby, bone articulation (trust me) and what she’s working on next and our love for The Overstory by Richard Powers. Place you hold here for all work by the fabulous Geraldine Brooks!

Geraldine Brooks recommends: The Overstory by Richard Powers

    

                                                      Follow her on Twitter: @geraldinebrooks and on Facebook @GeraldineBrooks


Episode 80! Interview with Jonathan Evison



Jonathan Evison’s latest, Small World, really swings for the fences in this sweeping Great American Novel that intricately weaves family sagas spanning centuries, generations and experience. Small World chronicles 170 years of American nation building – it’s a grand entertainment and I loved every page. Evison also took the time to talk about the libraries of his youth and the impact they had on his life. What a great interview, thank you so much Jonathan!

Place your holds here for all Jonathan Evison’s books!

Jonathan Evison recommends Hell of a Book by Jason Mott; Great Expectations by Charles Dickens; The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck; and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. 


Episode 70: Interview with Isla Morley



In this luminous historical fiction narrative inspired by the fascinating real case of the Blue People of Kentucky, Isla Morley probes questions of identity, love, and family in her breathtaking new novel.

In 1937, there are recesses in Appalachia no outsiders have ever explored. Two government-sponsored documentarians from Ohio, a writer and photographer are dispatched to penetrate this wilderness and record what they find for President Roosevelt’s Works Progress Administration. For photographer Clay Havens, the assignment is his last chance to reboot his flagging career. So when he and his journalist partner are warned away from the remote Spooklight Holler outside of town, they set off eagerly in search of a headline story.

I was hooked from the first page, second sentence. Morley’s prose is luminous indeed and I was thrilled to host her for this episode. A must read and book club gold. Can’t thank her enough for joining me.

Isla Morley recommends, The Body by Bill Bryson; Leaving Coy’s Hill by Katherine Sherbrooke; How to Fly by Barbara Kingsolver

   


Episode 60: Interview with Katherine A. Sherbrooke



Katherine A. Sherbrooke sat down with me for our 60th episode to talk about, Leaving Coy’s Hill, an unforgettable story about the triumphs and travails of a woman unwilling to play by the rules, based on the the remarkable life of pioneering feminist and abolitionist Lucy StoneLucy Stone was news to me until the gift of Leaving Coy’s Hill arrived in my mailbox.  I cannot wait for you all to discover Lucy and her incredible journey. Thank you so much Katherine Sherbrooke for joining me on this episode!

Katherine Sherbrooke recommends books by:  Jenna Blum, Rachel Barenbaum, Crystal King, Marjan Kamali, Christopher Castellani  

Get more information about Grub Street right here!


Episode 16: Interview with Elizabeth Crook author of The Which Way Tree



Fabulous conversation with author Elizabeth Crook about her latest novel, “The Which Way Tree”.  Do not miss this one! You’re in for quite a ride.

http://elizabethcrookbooks.com/